Germany: Nonsensical solar policies stem from lack of smart energy demand

January 31, 2011 at 2:37 am

Despite its often less-than-sunny climate, Germany has become one of the leading nations in solar power deployment. Yet this week, a little-noticed Reuters article reported something stunning: Germany’s Economy Ministry “wants to have solar power production switched off when the grid is overloaded on sunny days.” (Here, “overloaded” means too much supply — not too much demand.)

While most of the world struggles with fuel poverty, global warming, and meeting energy conservation targets, Germany’s new idea is to simply discard millions of euros’ worth of free solar energy. And this energy is indeed free, since sunshine is free and the solar panels are already installed and operating.

Why would this happen? Because in Germany, electricity supply and demand are not balanced.

Full story: Germany: Lack of smart energy demand could lead to nonsensical solar policies

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Entry filed under: Europe, Germany, Regulation, Renewables, smart energy demand, Smart Meters. Tags: .

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